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The Harambe decision & impulse buying

Did Harambe have to die? I don't know. In fact, none of us will ever know for sure if Harambe had to be shot dead. That he was shot and killed was the result of a decision taken in the shortest of time (ten minutes to be exact). I respect that decision. There are experts too who think it was the right decision. The risks were too great for a gamble. The wisdom of hindsight is no comfort at at time when someone has to decide whether the trigger needed to be pulled or not. The cost of pulling the trigger is a dead Gorilla, and a safe child. I can live with that. I know the 'crazed' PETAites can't, and I am not surprised.

In the world of consumption, the greater the risks associated with a purchase, the longer the time taken to arrive at a decision. The risks associated with buying can be financial, social, psychological, health-related and so on. Impulse buying on the other hand is the outcome of a decision arrived at the shortest time possible. That explains why impulse buys are rarely 'risky' buys.

The Harambe killing happened post a decision taken in ten minutes. It wasn't on impulse, though it may seem so. It was based on a quick consideration of how to keep a little boy safe. Just so you know, it ain't just Gorillas that are killed in split second decisions. Like I said earlier, I can live with the Harambe decision, knowing a boy's life was at stake.

You should too. 

Comments

Unknown said…
You sound so right..Happy about the little boy, in fact the happiness of the boy's safety is far more than what happened to Harambe...still the heart deep down somewhere feels n mourns for Harambe.

But you are so right professor. I always put myself into the shoes before coming to any conclusion. God forbid, what if my beloved Son was there? I would have died of heartbreak because of my Son's pain, not because of Harambe.

Which is why even after being a Peta follower, I kept myself away from Harambe postings and abuse that was showered on the decision taken for Harambe!!

You are so right professor!!

Regards
Lakshmi
Unknown said…
You sound so right..Happy about the little boy, in fact the happiness of the boy's safety is far more than what happened to Harambe...still the heart deep down somewhere feels n mourns for Harambe.

But you are so right professor. I always put myself into the shoes before coming to any conclusion. God forbid, what if my beloved Son was there? I would have died of heartbreak because of my Son's pain, not because of Harambe.

Which is why even after being a Peta follower, I kept myself away from Harambe postings and abuse that was showered on the decision taken for Harambe!!

You are so right professor!!

Regards
Lakshmi
Ray Titus said…
Thank you for your comment, Laxmi. Harambe's death is of course painful, and to be mourned. In fact 'senseless' killing of any living being is to be condemned. However this was a case where a difficult decision had to be made keeping in mind the safety of a li'l boy. I am glad someone made that decision, and hope there are no such repeats.

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